Monarto Cemetery

In Don Dunstan’s Day

(past Callington way)

‘Twas promised a shining new Polis would rise.

But…it’s still just pioneers

with long dried up tears

and six feet of clay to try on for size.

 

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4 thoughts on “Monarto Cemetery

    1. I love the cemeteries in Java, tiny affairs with little fences, filled with trees, ghost trees, as I call them. The dear departed reaching up into the sky and waving at us, or bursting into flower before our eyes. A kind of immortality.

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  1. Cemeteries are sad and romantic. This one for a town that never grew– I went by an obelisk on the Wimmera I think commemorating a gold rush city of thousands that left no trace on the plain. Who’ll come a’waltzing Matilda with me?

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    1. Yes, they’re endlessly fascinating, and become even more so as we begin to regard them as a future real estate choice. The ones in Java are magical, full of beautiful trees that let the ancestors wave in the wind and burst into bloom.

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